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Base 11 Space Challenge

Base 11 Space Challenge

The Base 11 Space Challenge is a $1M+ prize for the first student-led team to design, build and launch a liquid-fueled rocket to space. Read Overview...
Overview

Are you ready to launch to space?

 

The Base 11 Space Challenge is a $1M + prize for a student-led team to design, build and launch a liquid-propelled, single stage rocket to an altitude of 100 kilometers (the Karman Line) by December 30, 2021.
 

 

The future of the economy resides in space and other science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) sectors.  Indeed, the global space industry is projected to top $3 trillion dollars in the next 30 years, and the White House has re-launched the National Space Council to help accelerate commercial space exploration.  Many posit that efficient and affordable space travel is essential to the human race. But the number one resource needed to support the space industry is human capital. The current aerospace talent pipeline is in crisis.

We want to dramatically increase and empower the STEM talent in the United States, and we believe you are the solution.

The Base 11 Space Challenge will motivate universities to bolster their rocketry programs and to empower students to learn far more than the theory of liquid propulsion systems by providing access to critical resources and to world-class experts.  Students will acquire expertise in rocket safety, learn how to navigate flight regulations, and develop the essential skills of teamwork and innovation that are most in demand by forward-looking companies like SpaceX, Blue Origin, Google, Virgin Galactic, Northrop Grumman, Lockheed Martin, Dassault Systèmes, and Boeing. Teams will be encouraged to conduct outreach and provide mentorship to community college and high school students to better develop the STEM talent pipeline that includes women and ethnicities traditionally underrepresented in STEM.

Teams that participate in this Challenge will gain real-world experience in engineering, prototyping, testing, failure analysis, data management, teamwork, collaboration, and innovation. Additionally, team members are guaranteed interviews with at least one corporate partner.

Base 11 has teamed with Dassault Systèmes, who will offer their 3D design and simulation software to university teams free of charge and will waive fees for student team members to earn industry-recognized SOLIDWORKS and Catia certifications.  

 

* The Base 11 Space Challenge is sponsored by National Rocketry League, LLC, a subsidiary of Base 11.

 

Base 11 is a nonprofit workforce and entrepreneur development company on a mission to solve one of the country’s biggest problems: The growing science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent crisis fueled by the underrepresentation of women and ethnic minorities. Together with our partners, we are leading the STEM Revolution.

Our most revolutionary idea is this: that by fostering collaboration between forward-looking industry veterans and passionate, persistent students from high schools and colleges, we can transform high-potential, low-resource college and high school students into the STEM talent that industry so desperately needs. And in the process, we can transform lives and build a sustainable middle class for ALL Americans.

So what are you waiting for? Join the STEM Revolution.

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Base 11 is a nonprofit 501c3 workforce and entrepreneur development company on a mission to solve one of the country’s biggest problems: The growing science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent crisis fueled by the underrepresentation of women and ethnic minorities. Together with our partners, we are leading the STEM Revolution.

Our most revolutionary idea is this: that by fostering collaboration between forward-looking industry veterans and passionate, persistent students from high schools and colleges, we can transform high-potential, low-resource college and high school students into the STEM talent that industry so desperately needs. And in the process, we can transform lives and build a sustainable middle class for ALL Americans.

The Base 11 Space Challenge is a $1 million+ prize for a student-led university team to design, build, and launch a liquid-propelled, single-stage rocket to an altitude of 100 kilometers (the Karman Line) by December 30, 2021. Launch competitions will be held at Spaceport America in New Mexico.

The Challenge will feature annual competitions to achieve detailed milestone achievements for students to develop liquid-fuel rockets, including design, static testing, and smaller pop-up innovation challenges. The biggest purse, which is fully funded, is the $1 million space launch prize.

The mission behind the Base 11 Space Challenge is to dramatically increase the science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) talent in the United States with greater representation and inclusion of women and minorities, while empowering the future workforce with the education and skill-training necessary for jobs in the aerospace and related industries. Base 11 wants to ensure that the economic opportunity of the commercial space industry is open to women and minorities -- those left behind by the tech boom in Silicon Valley are not left behind by this coming wave.

Space launches, including SpaceX’s recent Falcon Heavy dramatic launch, continue to captivate imaginations around the world to dream of realizing a New Space Age. Space exploration is critical for our civilization to survive and thrive beyond the 21st century. The opportunities are endless, but we are faced with a huge problem: a STEM talent gap crisis. There are simply not enough qualified engineers and computer scientists in the pipeline to fill the growing demand of US industry and government.  

A $1M+ prize  is a significant incentive for universities to bolster their rocketry programs for students to learn more than the theory of liquid propulsion systems. Student participants will develop skills and real world experience in industry level safety protocols, systems engineering, propulsion, electronics, bench testing, computer aided design (CAD), navigation, flight regulation, diversity and inclusion, business development, teamwork, and innovation.

Dassault Systèmes is making its 3DExperience Platform available to up to 25 university teams registered to compete in the Space Challenge. This will give all schools a collaboration platform of leading engineering tools for their work. The 3DExperience Platform will also be used for all competing teams to submit their rocket designs and simulation results for judging, regardless of the software used to engineer their rocket.  Additionally, students registered in the competition will be able to use the 3DExperience platform for use as a professional digital portfolio of their work. Finally, Dassault Systemes will also waive the fee to take the Solidworks and CATIA certification exams for eligible students participating in the Base 11 Space Challenge.

Base 11 is a nonprofit STEM workforce and entrepreneur accelerator on a mission to solve one of the country’s greatest problems: the growing science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) talent crisis, fueled by the underrepresentation of women and ethnic minorities. By solving this problem, we can also establish a sustainable middle class inclusive of all Americans.

The Base 11 Space Challenge enhances the STEM talent pipeline and supports inclusion by requiring university teams to strengthen their own talent pipeline. By partnering with a local community college and high school to share outreach activities, teams can engage and ultimately recruit more diversified talent to sustain their teams over the four-years of the challenge and beyond.

Currently, the commercial space industry, including SpaceX and Blue Origin, use liquid-fueled engines, yet most existing student rocketry programs focus on solids or hybrids. Because the Base 11 Space Challenge aims to fulfill the urgent need for diverse, well-trained STEM talent, the challenge focuses on liquid propulsion.

Creating and implementing a world-class safety protocol for liquid fueled rocketry teams in universities across the US and Canada is a top objective of the Base 11 Space Challenge. A team of nationally recognized safety experts is developing guidelines specifically for the student teams participating in the challenge. The Safety Advisory council includes current and retired employees of SpaceX, Boeing, Rocketjet Aerodyne, Pratt Witney and New Mexico Spaceport Authority.  Base 11 is also working with the operations division of the FAA’s Office of Commercial Space.

Further, each team will be required to designate a Safety Officer and complete mandatory safety training, including maintaining detailed safety logs.

By 2021, the Challenge is expected to deliver:

A well-trained and fully vetted talent pipeline that will be available to aerospace and tech employers.Participants will learn the safety requirements necessary for working with rocketry and particularly liquid-fueled launch vehicles.Student participants will have documented the real-world job skills they gained, such as engineering design, 3D imaging, project management, and systems integration.

One or more university teams will make it to space.

The silos between industry, academia, philanthropy, and non-profits will be broken down and an integrated, scalable STEM talent development model will be established on a national scale.

Hundreds of students will be accelerated into the Base 11 Victory Circle.

Base 11 will distribute $1.15 million over the course of this three phase challenge, with a $1 million award being the ultimate prize for the rocket that reaches the 100 Km altitude mark by December 2021.  Smaller prizes will be awarded during the three phases for technical achievement and for innovative problem-solving. The monies won from these competitions are intended to help teams defray some of the financial burdens associated the Challenge.  Please see the full prize breakdown in the Challenge Guidelines.

Spaceport America will host all launch attempts.

Teams from any US or Canadian institution of higher learning are eligible to participate, as long as they have provided all the required entry information by the September 28, 2018 deadline. Please see the Official Rules for complete eligibility requirements.

There are opportunities for everyone to get involved. Companies can join the Base 11 Space Challenge as sponsors by providing materials, facilities, or expertise to support the teams. Individuals can volunteer their time as mentors for teams or make financial contributions. K-College students can submit a design to our logo competition to create the branding for the Base 11 Space Challenge.

Creating tomorrow’s aerospace innovators requires mentorship from current aerospace industry innovators. Become a Base 11 Space Challenge mentor to share your expertise directly with student challenge participants. And in the process, get to know personally some of the world’s brightest up-and-coming talent.

Opportunities include mentoring a specific university team, developing a deep relationship with that group, or providing expertise that benefits all challenge participants, through a webinar, real-time Q&A, or in-person meetings with team leaders.  We’re committed to working with you to tailor a mentorship opportunity that bring the most value to you, your company, and the teams.

If you’re interested in becoming a mentor for the Base 11 Space Challenge, visit our Mentors Page!

Sponsorship opportunities are currently available. Please contact spacechallenge@base11.com for information. 

All rockets must comply with the Base 11 Space Challenge System Requirements. Within the scope of these System requirements, what the rocket looks like and how it works is up to the teams.

Students teams may buy an engine and other off-the-shelf components and may use mentors and subject matter experts to provide design critique and similar guidance.  But launchable rockets are expected to be solely the product of student teams' efforts in terms of design, execution against design, full integration, and launch.

Absolutely. All intellectual property rights, if any, in the idea, concept, or activities demonstrated by the Submission will remain with the Competition Team. 

Please see the Entrant Application section of the Challenge Guidelines for instructions on how to register your team.

 

Yes, every person who is listed on your Team Roster must register on HeroX by clicking ACCEPT CHALLENGE and agreeing to the official rules. 

Your team entry must also include the following for each student and faculty advisor:

  1. A signed media waiver
  2. A completed biography
  3. A head and shoulders photograph (minimum 300 dpi resolution)
  4. Students only: Verification that he or she is a current student at the team-affiliated university (verification certificate from university registrar of the type provided for health or auto insurance)
  5. Students only: A signed parental consent form if under the age of 18

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Please note that as new members join the team:

  1. Their names must be added to an updated team roster
  2. They must complete and submit the individual team member forms listed in section 1.c. above
  3. They must accept the Official Rules.
  4. They must attend the virtual safety training series.

All teams must be registered prior to September 28th, 2018. No late registrants will be accepted

The team roster lists a number of roles, and ideally, all roles will be filled.  Teams are encouraged to assign members to specific roles.  However, 4 student roles and 1 faculty role are required.  Specific names must be entered into these 5 roles for the team entry to be complete.  The required roles are:

  1. Faculty Advisor
  2. CEO (team leader)
  3. Chief Engineer
  4. Chief Safety Officer
  5. Business Development Director (business and marketing)

The Judging Panel does not intend to eliminate any teams. The judges may recommend some team collaborations in cases where it is unlikely that sufficient progress will be made by certain teams on their own. Gross violation of the Safety Document or failure to follow competition guidelines are grounds for disqualification from the challenge.

In general, Pop-up Innovation Contests are only open to registered university teams. Each Pop-up Innovation Contest will have it’s own competition guidelines.

We recommend you post your question in the Forum as it’s likely other people have a similar question. You can also email your questions to spacechallenge@base11.com.

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