Ken Burner
May 22, 2020
9:12 p.m. PDT

Orbiter

Will the missions have their own orbiter(s)? If so, what communication abilities will it have? Would it have RADAR. If so, is it any band other than Ka? Will it have any frequency of LASER? What type of instrumentation? What orbital paths are planned for the missions?
8 Replies

Ken Burner
May 22, 2020
9:27 p.m. PDT
edited
@Ken Burner
If the missions have Orbiters, will a GNSS be set up by them? If not, are there GNSS missions planned in the same time frame as this part of the CLPS program? If not, then a TDRSS?
Tagged: Ken Burner

Kyla Jeffrey HeroX team
May 27, 2020
9:27 a.m. PDT
No. It is unlikely that the mission will have its own orbiter. You should assume that any rover will communicate to a lander and that the lander will have a direct link to Earth.
Tagged: Ken Burner

Ken Burner
May 30, 2020
6:22 p.m. PDT
edited
@Kyla Jeffrey
It appears that all missions are on the near side then, correct? Will the Lander or Rover be able to communicate with Earth through the LRO? It would be desirable to have an orbiting comm relay link from the Rover or the Payload in the event of Lander communication failure.

Frankly, I'm not comfortable spending a lot of time and money, designing and prototyping Payloads, if the Lander is a single point of failure for my Payload's data transfer.
Tagged: Kyla Jeffrey

Ken Burner
May 30, 2020
6:39 p.m. PDT
edited
@Ken Burner
I watched live, with much excitement, Alan Bean's last first and last video transmission from the surface of the Moon. It was short.

A single point of failure and then my view of the rest of the mission went dark...
Tagged: Ken Burner

Ken Burner
June 2, 2020
12:47 p.m. PDT
@Ken Burner
If no 'Orbiter', will any object larger than a basketball be left in orbit around the Moon for e.g. target acquisition?

If not, will anything of significant mass be impacted on the Moon from the mission. If so, can a delay to impact time be put into place to allow for Payload configuration time (i.e. battery charging, etc.) for e.g. seismic activity recordings?
Tagged: Ken Burner

Kyla Jeffrey HeroX team
June 6, 2020
9:47 a.m. PDT
It is expected that early CLPS missions will have direct LOS for communications to Earth (i.e. not on the far side of the moon from the Earth). Rover payload developers should assume that the rover will be able to communicate to the lander which will have a communications link to Earth via direct communications or via a relay. There is no guarantee that the LRO will be involved in the communications path.

Kyla Jeffrey HeroX team
June 6, 2020
9:48 a.m. PDT
Right now it is very hard to predict any manmade impact events that could stimulate a signal for seismic measurements. An earlier mission (LCROSS) used its 2nd stage booster to create an impact plume in a permanently shadowed crater. This would have provided a nice seismic signal. It is possible that a CLPS mission could do something similar however the timing and orbital mechanics would have to be orchestrated very closely since the relatively short lifetime of the rover and lander of one lunar day does not provide a large window of opportunity to capture measurements.

Ken Burner
June 7, 2020
9:54 a.m. PDT
@Kyla Jeffrey
I remember that mission. USA plowed a spent Centaur into a southern Moon crater. I had a nice 6" telescope set up just right for friends and family to view the impact plume. We did not see any ejection. Disappointed we were, but found it a fun time anyways. We did find it very humerus that others claimed to have seen it and even photo it.

We believe we were set up correctly and that others misinterpreted their "data."
Tagged: Kyla Jeffrey
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