Ken Burner
June 19, 2020
11:34 p.m. PDT
edited

Who needs a Lander?

A Lunar penetration type hollow Spike. The Spike is nudged toward the Moon from L1. The Spike is stabilized by forward and aft quad CO2 thrusters plus a slight roll keeping the Spike in alignment for it's normal to the Moon's surface impact.

The Spike contains 12 Payloads in a serial stack upon a shock honeycomb energy dissipating platform within the Spikes hollow core.

Kids in America, via RC radio controllers, drive the Tractors (e.g. auger craft ) out of the Spike first, deploying the solar array panels. After power is established then primary Payloads are deployed by the Tractors, with near continuous operations if operating at the 'special' North Pole areas.

The Payloads are of the standard 1/2 CubeSat design. Many are modular requiring physical placement/coupling/partnering by the Tractors.

For best results use kids with gaming talents to assemble the Colony.
6 Replies

Ken Burner
June 20, 2020
12:10 a.m. PDT
edited
Bouncing 'beachball' landing is easier but doesn't provide the sub-regolith data that a Spike would.

Ken Burner
June 20, 2020
1:45 a.m. PDT
OK, it probably wouldn't bounce, unless the ablative onion skinned decel 'balloons' were rather perfect. So more like a water-balloon splat on the Lunar surface I'd guess.

Spike has an RF advantage by forming a ground rod & subsequent ground plane.

Ken Burner
June 23, 2020
9:11 p.m. PDT
edited
@Ken Burner
Decel joules are transferred from kinetic energy to piezoelectric energy to storing the electrons in super caps for boot up and charging Li-Ion, or perhaps better yet in the Lunar environment and for repurposing considerations, Lead - Acid batteries. RF communications would be established after the solar arrays/antennas are deployed autonomously.
Tagged: Ken Burner

Ken Burner
June 23, 2020
9:40 p.m. PDT
It would seem, through timed early onset vectoring, that a Spike would be capable of landing over a fairly broad spectrum of the Moon's surface without much in the way of on-board energy requirements.

Ken Burner
June 23, 2020
9:59 p.m. PDT
edited
To keep mission costs down the use of 'buses' from retired LGM-118 Peacekeeper MIRV's or equivalents would dispense 10 or 12 Spikes, as some Spikes may impact rocks or have other failures.

Leon Hulett
July 4, 2020
4:41 a.m. PDT
The energy, E, potential and kinetic energy at location L1 would equal E at lunar landing point, location point, LP.

But there is the lunar Gravity Well.

At the bottom of this lunar Gravity Well, at the location of impact, there will be a relative velocity, V, in the direction of the center of gravity of the moon, where potential energy has converted to kinetic energy, that your honey-comb structure will have to be designed to accommodate. Care to estimate what that value of V is?

When Newton observed an apple falling from a tree to the ground, I think he might mentally estimate its velocity on impact. If an apple falls from L1 at 150,000,000 km it might be a bit faster at landing point, LP. I think I would have to do the math, I can't estimate that one.
Post Your Reply
Let these people know about your message